Sunday, March 01, 2015

Snow Fell on Alabama

There's a rare mingling of sensations with a new-fallen snow.  Fresh yet familiar.  Excitement mixed with a remarkable quiet.

And every time feels like the first time.

Only a few things in life are like that, I think.  Christmas is like that.  The day you feel the first hint of fall in the air.  Sunsets are a bit like that. The beginning of college football each year is like that for me.

And here in the South, snow is like that.

After many letdowns and missed predictions the past two weeks, we finally got a beautiful, snowman-able snow on Wednesday.  And it was even more than they had predicted.  (I like to think of our local weather forecasters in terms of a Dos Equis commercial: "We don't always correctly predict when it's going to snow, but when we do, we severely underestimate the amount.")

It began around 2 o'clock in the afternoon and by sunset (when I went out to measure) we had nearly seven inches.  It continued to snow, though a bit lighter, until I went to bed.  My guesstimate would be we got around 9 inches.

So deep it was that I didn't go into work Thursday morning.  Anyone who knows me knows it takes an act of Congress for me to miss work.  (OK, so I actually did go in for about two hours around lunch.  Apparently there was a filibuster.)

Here are a few pics from our veritable winter wonderland...

"In the lane, snow is glistenin'..."

Where there's snow, there must be snow creme.

This looked like a postcard, except with poorer resolution.  Much, much poorer.

Hard to believe in a month, this yard will be covered with grass. And mosquitoes.

With apologies to Arthur Miller, I call this one "Death of a Snowman." (Biff Snowman?)
I'm sure it's comical for those in northern climes to see how we in the South react to snow.  Schools close.  Roads close.  (All roads were deemed impassable sometime Wednesday evening.)  Heck, even the Walmart closed this time.

People scurry to the store to stock up on milk, bread, and eggs like it's 1848 and they're at Independence, Missouri, stocking up the wagon for the arduous, months-long trip to the Willamette Valley.

And then there's the driving.

One guy had gotten stuck attempting to back out of his driveway.  This idiot had foregone shoveling any snow and somehow maneuvered his car to where it was now nearly perpendicular to the driveway.  So he was out there shoveling (It was more of a spade, really.  I mean, let's call a spade a spade, eh?) and had some poor woman out there attempting to help him, except she was using a garden hoe.  I can only assume she felt sorry for the hopeless sap.

It's not difficult to imagine every single person that passed during that twenty-minute ordeal were laughing heartily.

As for me, I didn't laugh.  But I was pret-ty sore the next day from all the shoveling.

"Forty-six, anechoic / Forty-seven, blown from polar fur / Forty-eight, vanishing world / Forty-nine, mistral despair..."

18 comments:

  1. I think as long as there's snow anywhere there will be people stocking up on food--bread even if they're gluten free, milk even if they're lactose intolerant etc etc

    Proud you took part of the day off.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sure you're right. It's just odd here because it always warms up so quickly that we're never snowed in for more than a day, maybe two in the most extreme cases. *knocks on wood*

      Delete
  2. Snow cream is more a of Southern thing--I remember we always made it on the rare occasions when it snowed but when I lived up north, I seldom made it

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I'm sure in places where it snows half the winter, it probably loses its appeal a little.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Thanks, sir. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  4. Yes, I am amused. I like the fresh anticipation and appreciation of the stuff. If only we haven't had tons of it for three months, I'd be happy too. Enjoy it while it lasts. Then feel free to take what's here. Lovely pics.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's such a rarity here and a treat. I'd probably have at least a slightly different view if we swapped places.

      Delete
  5. It is rather hard to remember my snow days in the south ...old age and all. I should save my stories for blog fodder though. ;)

    Snow.. snow, that can't be good for suede, can it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't worry, I turned my jacket inside out :)

      Delete
  6. Yes I find all the stories very amusing of the south's struggle with snow. It keeps my mind off the miseries of the days stuck inside due to the cold. I figure your backing out of the driveway story should get me through the last week or two of winter! Thanks man, I knew I could count on you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha. Glad I could help out. Too bad I didn't take out a mailbox or anything. That probably would've gotten you clear through next winter.

      Delete
  7. I got emails from people asking about job vacancies because of the snow in Alabama.

    ReplyDelete
  8. That poor snowman! Haha. I love the pic!

    Is there video of the "shoveling?"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I doubt it. Unless one of the 10 or so passersby decided to take some video on their iPhone and upload it to YouTube. And no one ever does anything like that, right?

      Delete
  9. Fair play means we also have to admit that people in Northern climes are wusses about heat--all "It's 90 degrees and feels humid, so I have to lay down."

    The mocking goes both ways!

    For me, a big part of the magic of snow is the quiet of it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 90 would be a fairly pleasant July day.

      Yes, the quiet! Especially when you can literally hear the flakes landing.

      Delete